360.907.1118 kurtsseptic@yahoo.com

Septic System Inspection and Repair

If you received a post card from the county, you are selling your home, you are purchasing a home or it’s just time for a septic system inspection give Kurt’s Septic Service a call.  I’ve been serving Clark County home owners for more than 23 years, and I’m looking forward to serving you.

Why do you need to have your septic system inspected?

Septic system inspection of your system components can prevent damage to soil and water around your home and may also extend the useful life of your system. Without periodic septic system inspections, your system could backup and result in a septic tank failure. The cost to replace a residential septic treatment system can range on the low side from $7,000 and on the high side to more than $15,000.

I am a O&M 1 and O&M 2 Certified Specialist and am licensed.  I can inspect and file your report with the county for any of the following systems:

  • Gravity septic systems
  • Pump to gravity septic systems
  • Sand filter septic systems
  • Sand septic  systems
  • Mound septic  systems
  • Pressure distribution septic  systems

You can give me a call or simply follow the link below to schedule you septic system inspection.  I will come out when scheduled, thoroughly inspect your system and file all of the necessary paperwork with the county on your behalf all for one flat fee, there are never any hidden charges with me.

 

How often do you need septic system inspection?

There are many factors that go into how often a septic system need to be inspected.  Look through the list below, and select your system type, you will find some useful information about your septic system and about it’s inspection requirements. In addition you will find a general lists of do’s and dont’s that apply to all septic systems provided by the Clark County Department of Health.  With proper care a typical septic system should give you twenty to thirty or more years of basically trouble free use.  The performance and the lifespan of your septic system is directly impacted by the care given to it and how the system is operated an maintained.

Gravity Septic System

Gravity Septic System Inspection

Your Gravity Septic System needs to be inspected at a minimum of every 3 years.

In a gravity system, as wastewater enters the septic tank, it pushes effluent out the other end, through a network of pipes, to the drain field. This is gravity flow to the drain field, and no pump is needed.

The heart of a gravity septic system is the septic tank, because a good-quality tank can remove two-thirds or more of the wastewater contaminants. A good-quality tank is properly sized, watertight, and structurally sound. Leaking tanks pollute your yard and the groundwater. They also allow groundwater to flow into your tank, overloading your drain field and shortening its life.

In addition, your septic tank needs to have access risers to-grade, equipped with durable, bolted lids. These risers and lids give service providers access to your tank (without having to dig it up), so they can check the sludge and scum levels inside it. Then they can pump your tank, when the levels get too high.

Your tank also needs to be equipped with an effluent filter so that large particles are removed from the wastewater, before it flows to your drain field. This will also protect your investment in your drain field and extend its life.

Pump To Gravity Septic System

Pump to Gravity Septic System Inspection

Your Pump to Gravity Septic System needs to be inspected at a minimum every 3 years.

In a gravity system, as wastewater enters the septic tank, it pushes effluent out the other end, through a network of pipes, to the drain field. This is gravity flow to the drain field, and no pump is needed.  In a Pump to Gravity system the addition of a pump tank. allows the drain field to be located up-slope from the septic tank. In addition, the drain field is dosed which permits intermittent resting of the drain field between doses. Additional maintenance to the pump tank and float switches are necessary.

Like the gravity septic system the heart of a pump to gravity septic system is the septic tank. A good-quality tank is properly sized, watertight, and structurally sound. Leaking tanks pollute your yard and the groundwater. They also allow groundwater to flow into your tank, overloading your drain field and shortening its life.  Just as important though is the pump tank, sizing is also crucial for the pump tank to allow the system to operate efficiently.

In addition, your septic tank needs to have access risers to-grade, equipped with durable, bolted lids. These risers and lids give service providers access to your tank (without having to dig it up), so they can check the sludge and scum levels inside it. Then they can pump your tank, when the levels get too high.

Your tank also needs to be equipped with an effluent filter so that large particles are removed from the wastewater, before it flows to your drain field. This will also protect your investment in your drain field and extend its life.

Sand Filter Septic System

Yearly 
Note: Some systems are so complex the manufacturer recommends inspection more often for the first 2 years; be sure to meet the conditions of your warranty.

Sand Septic System

Ensure that a current report of system status is on file with Clark County Public Health when a property served by anon-site septic system is offered for sale.  The report of system status is considered current for purposes of this subsection if it was completed within one (1) year of the date of sale. You can check your homes status here

Mound Septic System

Mound Septic System Inspection

Your Mound Septic System needs to be inspected yearly.

Note: Some systems are so complex the manufacturer recommends inspection more often for the first 2 years; be sure to follow the guidelines laid out by the manufacturer of your system to meet the conditions of your warranty.

A treatment-based system consisting of pressurized lines lying in a sand bed mounded above the original soil surface. Requires at least 18 inches of permeable soil above a restrictive layer to be used on new construction. This system type has allowed construction on sites previously thought unsuitable due to lack of soil depth. The complexity of this system and the situations in which it is used requires periodic maintenance and proper operation to assure continued performance standards be met over time.

Pressure Distribution Septic System

Pressure Distribution Septic System Inspection

Your Pressure Distribution Septic System needs to be inspected every 2 years.

*Clark County received a waiver from WA-DOH for inspection every 2 years.

Pressure distribution drainfields consist of a pump in the septic tank, a transport manifold, and perforated distribution piping in the drainfield. The distribution piping is pressurized, so that a small dose of effluent is equally distributed throughout the entire drainfield.

Septic System Do's & Dont's

On-site septic system Do’s and Don’ts

Do’s

  • Learn the location of your septic system, drainfield and reserve area, and keep a sketch of it with the maintenance records.
  • Have your septic tank inspected by a certified O & M specialist as required per CCC 24.17.
  • Keep your septic tank cover accessible for inspections and pumping. Install risers if necessary.
  • Keep detailed records of repairs, pumpings, inspections, permits, and other maintenance activities.
  • Conserve water to avoid overloading the system; stagger wash load days and repair any leaks.
  • Divert other sources of water (roof drains, house footing drains, sump pumps) away from system.
  • Contact a professional when you experience problems with your system.
  • Obtain a permit from Clark County Public Health (397-8428) for all repairs and alterations.
  • Use household cleaners in moderation and follow directions on labels.

Dont’s

  • Don’t enter a septic tank; toxic gases are produced in the tank that can be deadly within minutes.
  • Don’t drive, park, or do any activity that will compact the soil on top of the system.
  • Don’t plant anything over or near the drainfield except grass. Roots can damage the drain lines, and trees may shade the drainfield. Excessive irrigation over or near the system may also cause damage.
  • Don’t dig into the drainfield or cover it with any hard surface or building.
  • Don’t repair your system without a required permit from Clark County Public Health (360-397-8428).
  • Don’t use septic tank additives.
  • Don’t use your system as a trash can for grease, coffee grinds, cigarette butts, diapers, sanitary napkins, tampons, condoms, paper towels, plastics, cat litter, latex paints, pesticides, any hazardous chemical, or other non-biodegradable substance.

For more information on how to properly maintain your septic system. Download this PDF from the Clark County Health Department.

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